Congratulations to Prince William Co. Sheriff’s Office

 

Gary M. Dillon, VLEPSC Program Manager, Lt. Kellie Meehan, Accreditation Manager, and Sheriff Glendell Hill

Gary M. Dillon, VLEPSC Program Manager, Lt. Kellie Meehan, Accreditation Manager, and Sheriff Glendell Hill

The Prince William County Sheriff’s Office received their 5th VLEPSC award at their Board of Supervisors meeting on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. The PWSO was the 2nd agency to become accredited when VLEPSC first began accrediting law enforcement agencies in 1996. The office is led by Sheriff Glendell Hill who has been sheriff for 3 of the 5 awards. Lt. Kellie Meehan is the accreditation manager and she is assisted by 1st Sgt. Amanda Thompson.

Town of West Point Police Department Receives its First Accreditation Award

Commissioner Emmett Harmon, West Point Chief Robert Mawyer, and Gary M. Dillon, VLEPSC Program Manager

Commissioner Emmett Harmon, West Point Chief Robert Mawyer, and Gary M. Dillon, VLEPSC Program Manager

The West Point Police Department was awarded accredited status by the Virginia Law En-forcement Professional Standards Commission (VLEPSC) at the West Point Town Council meeting held on October 29, 2013. Chief Emmett Harmon of the James City County PD (representing VLEPSC) and Mr. Gary Dillon of the Department of Criminal Justice Services presented the certificate which now proudly hangs in the front foyer of the police depart-ment. Also in attendance to show support of the department and this accomplishment were Sheriff Jeff Walton of King William, Sheriff Wakie Howard and Chief Deputy Joe McLaughlin of New Kent and Retired Chief Tom Clark.

Of the nearly 400 law enforcement agencies in Virginia, the West Point Police Department is one of only 89 agencies to become accredited. The Department also has the designation of being the smallest accredited police department in the Commonwealth.

The VLEPSC accreditation program is designed to measure and confirm compliance with the professional standards recognized as the best management practices of the law en-forcement community. In Virginia, law enforcement agencies can seek and achieve accredited status but they are not required to do so. This process is completely voluntary which further distinguishes the West Point Police Department for their commitment to professionalism and their willingness to be measured by and compared to the best in the profession.

Lt. Bill England Receives Coveted Commissioner’s Award

VLEPSC Chairman Tim Longo presents the 2013 Commissioner's Award to Lt. Bill England (Westmoreland Co. SO)

VLEPSC Chairman Tim Longo presents the 2013 Commissioner’s Award to Lt. Bill England (Westmoreland Co. SO)

The VALEAC Annual Conference was held during the week of October 14, 2013. The Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission (VLEPSC) met during this meeting to hear agencies for accredited/reaccredited status. During this meeting, Chairman Tim Longo stated:

“As you know, each year the Commission recognizes one of our many dedicated and professional volunteers who give their time and themselves to staffing the many VLEPSC assessments. They serve as assessors and team leaders to ensure the important business of State Accreditation is accomplished.  The recipient, nominated by Mr. Dillon with concurrence of the Commission, follows many previous recipients of this award that has been awarded annually since 2002.

After the Commission’s careful consideration, it is my honor and privilege to announce that

Master Assessor, Lt. Bill England, Westmoreland Co. Sheriff’s Office, is the recipient of the 2013 Commissioner’s Award

Lt. England is a 25-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Office and currently serves as the Accreditation Manager for the Sheriff’s Office. He has served on many assessments and mocks as well as serving as Team Leader and serves as a Master Assessor for the Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission.”

 

Town of Quantico Police Receives VML Grant for Accreditation Fees, supplies

Quanticopd003The Town of Quantico Police Department received a grant of $490 from the Virginia Municipal League Insurance Programs to assist the agency in application and self assessment costs.

Each year VMLIP provides Risk Management Grant funding to members for the purchase of vital equipment and training to strengthen risk management programs.

Grants can be used to purchase safety equipment, attend training sessions, and to use for educational endeavors aimed at broadening member understanding of governmental risk management.

Members are eligible for grant funding based on their Risk Management Guideline Tier and lines of coverage. Members who participate in all coverage lines are eligible for the greatest benefit. Grant funds are available on a first come first serve basis.

Va. Beach Sheriff’s Office changes its (uniform) colors

The Virginia Beach Sheriff's Office is debuting new uniforms Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. Here, from left, Sgt. Donna Millner-Adams is in the new "Class B" uniform, Sheriff Ken Stolle is wearing the new dress uniform and Lt. Joseph Bartolomeo, Jr. is in the new Class A uniform. (Courtesy of the Virginia Beach Sheriff's Office)

The Virginia Beach Sheriff’s Office is debuting new uniforms Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. Here, from left, Sgt. Donna Millner-Adams is in the new “Class B” uniform, Sheriff Ken Stolle is wearing the new dress uniform and Lt. Joseph Bartolomeo, Jr. is in the new Class A uniform. (Courtesy of the Virginia Beach Sheriff’s Office)

Deputies in Virginia Beach will debut a solid, navy blue uniform at shift change Monday morning. No dark brown stripe down the side of the leg and, perhaps most importantly, no stifling material that was the law for decades.

“It’s a more breathable material. They’re excited about the change in that regard,” said Ashley Lanteigne, spokeswoman for the Virginia Beach Sheriff’s Office.

The move to blue comes after uniform suppliers reduced inventory of the brown material, pumping up the expense for sheriff’s offices. The change in colors will save Virginia Beach’s office about $61,000 a year, Lanteigne said.

Now, the color change is also legal.

In 2005, the Virginia General Assembly voted to throw out a 1980s law dictating that deputies wear dark brown shirts and taupe pants. Sheriff’s offices across the state can now pick any color they wish to don.

On Monday, a ceremony will take place at 6:15 a.m., and Sheriff Ken Stolle will speak before the night shift deputies make their last exit in the soon-to-be retired uniforms.

Story courtesy of the Pilot Online